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Research Article

ScienceAsia 24 (1998): 081-090 |doi: 10.2306/scienceasia1513-1874.1998.24.081

BEHAVIOURAL EFFECTS OF RHOMBENCEPHALIC CELL SUSPENSION TRANSPLANS INTO THE RAT AFTER CEREBELLAR LESIONING WITH KAINIC ACID

NUANCHAN KRITSANASRINUAN, VEERASAK THERAPANCHAREON AND NAIPHINICH KOTCHABHAKDI

ABSTRACT: The embryonic rhombencephalic tissue suspensions isolated from E 15 stage rat embryos were injected into the cerebellar vermis of adult rats which had been lesioned with kainic acid 10 nM one week before transplantation. The result from the histological studies indicated that the grafted neural cells grow and differentiate into adult Purkinje cells, migrate into the host molecular layer and organize into a single cell layer to replace the Purkinje cells lost after kainic acid lesioning. The results from the behavioural studies indicated that the transplantation of the rhombencepha/ic cell suspension into the lesioned area in the cerebellar cortex can improve the motor deficits as shown by a decrease in the frequency of dysmetria, and an increase in the frequency of normal rearing behaviour. At 3 months after transplantation, there was no significant difference in the frequencies of dysmetria and normal rearing behaviour between the transplantation and the control groups. However, when observed with neurological tests, the percent of correct response of the transplantation group was larger than the lesioned group, but still had a significance difference (p O.05) from the control group. In summary, the embryonic rhombencephalic cell suspension can be functionally integrated into a host brain and restore the motor deficits caused by the lesioning in the cerebellum, and although this restoration does not reach normal levels, it is significantly different from the lesioned animals. The results from this experiment suggest that the open-field testing and the neurological examination are useful for evaluation of functional recovery as effects of the grafted tissues, with the neurological examination being more sensitive for detecting the functional effects of transplanted tissue than open-field testing.

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Neurobehavioural Biology Center, Institute of Science and Technology for Research and Development, Mahidol University, Salaya, Nakorn Pathom 73170, Thailand

Received March 3, 1998